The following text is taken from the intro to the new album “N-Plants” on Touch Records.

Geir Jenssen (Biosphere) writes: “Early February 2011: Decided to make an album inspired by the Japanese post-war economic miracle. While searching for more information I found an old photo of the Mihama nuclear plant. The fact that this futuristic-looking plant was situated in such a beautiful spot so close to the sea made me curious. Are they safe when it comes to earthquakes and tsunamis? Further reading revealed that many of these plants are situated in earthquake-prone areas, some of them are even located next to shores that had been hit in the past by tsunamis.

A photo of Mihama made me narrow down my focus only to Japanese nuclear plants. I wanted to make a soundtrack to some of them, concentrating on the architecture, design and localizations, but also questioning the potential radiation danger (a cooling system being destroyed by a landslide or earthquake, etc). As the head of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said: “the plants were so well designed that ‘such a situation is practically impossible’.

The album was finished on February 13th. On March 17th I received the following message from a Facebook friend:
“Geir, some time ago you asked people for a photo of a Japanese nuclear powerplant. Is this going to be the sleeve of your new coming album? But more importantly: how did you actually predict the future? “
Kind regards, David.

Jenssen was born in 1962 in Tromso, a city within the Arctic Circle in the northernmost portion of Norway. He would later become famous for his “arctic sound”.
He was initially inspired by the music of artists such as New Order, Depeche Mode, Wire, and Brian Eno, which he described as “like discovering a new universe’s universe which I wanted to be a part of”. In 1983, he bought his first synthesizer and composed his first piece of music, taking influence from his archaeological studies, later stating “Studying the Ice Age and Stone Age has definitely influenced my music.” In 1984 Jenssen issued his first album, Likvider, released on cassette only and credited to E-man.
In 1985, Jenssen was part of the newly-created Norwegian moody synth trio Bel Canto with Nils Johansen and singer Anneli Drecker. The band signed to Belgian label Crammed Discs and to Nettwerk in the US, and relocated to Brussels. Jenssen, however, soon returned to Tromso, collaborating with the other band members by post, and continuing with his solo work. Bel Canto released two albums while Jenssen was a member, White-Out Conditions and Birds of Passage. In 1990, he left the band in order to pursue a different music style altogether, and began using a sampler.
Throughout the late 1980s, Jenssen used the moniker Bleep, under which he produced various 12″ records, now releasing records via the Crammed Discs subsidiary SSR. His early influences were from acid house and New Beat music.
Released in 1990, The North Pole by Submarine was the only album recorded as Bleep. Further singles followed in 1990 and 1991 before Jenssen abandoned the Bleep moniker and took a distinct change in artistic direction.

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